Artwork can be inspirations for many things, including food! These four pizzas provided by Jules Thin Crust Pizza in Doylestown are inspired by four very different artworks found in the Michener Art Museum’s collection. Created in conjunction with Foodie Friday on May 15th at the Michener along with National Pizza Party Day, it’s a day to celebrate all things art and food! Read more below and visit the following links to learn more about the art and the artists that inspired them.

Our first work, Puzzlehead, (top left) is a unique work of art found in the Michener’s collection. It was created by four modernist artists. They worked together to make this work, often using jazz music for inspiration. Learn more about the work here and see it in high resolution on Google Arts and Culture. Looking for a fun collaborative activity to do with your kids after you eat your pizza? Download this activity sheet to create some collaborative artwork and poetry!

The second artwork, Door and Surround, (top right), is a unique work installed in the Museum’s galleries that used to be part of the artist’s home. Phillip Lloyd Powell, a long time resident of New Hope, created this very special door inspired by his many travels and his talent in woodworking. Learn more about the work here and how you can create your own magical door at home with the guidance of our Arts Education Manager, Andrea Thompson in her YouTube Video.  See the work in high resolution on Google Arts and Culture.

The third work (lower left), Back Road to Pipersville, is a work created by Fern Coppedge, one of the few recognized female Pennsylvania Impressionist painters. Her unique style and bold use of color stood out among the rest of the painters of that time period. She created her work outdoors in all types of weather and winter was her favorite season! Learn more about her work here and see the painting in high resolution on Google Arts and Culture. Create a landscape of your own inspired by her work with this activity sheet.

The fourth work (lower right), is the largest artwork in the Museum’s collection and has a very special story.  In April 1926, Daniel Garber completed this 22 foot mural, A Wooded Watershed, in only six weeks in his studio at Cuttalossa. It was commissioned for the 150th anniversary of America’s birth and exhibited at the Pennsylvania Sesquicentennial that same year. What is a mural? Learn more about murals through this gallery guide.  Want to test your knowledge on Pennsylvania history? Use this activity sheet. Don’t forget to see this work in super high gigapixel resolution on Google Arts and Culture!

Enjoy the art and the pizza in your celebration of National Pizza Party Day! Tell us what you think by sending us your comments below.