Learn

with the Michener Art Museum

 

Learn

with the Michener Art Museum

 
 

Learn

With the Michener Art Museum

 

Learn

with the Michener Art Museum

 

Learn

with the Michener Art Museum

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Look

Looking at artwork closely is the first step toward exciting explorations in art! View artworks from the Bucks County region featured in the collections of the James A. Michener Art Museum and the Bucks County Intermediate Unit. Learn how artworks created in the Bucks County region connect to the arts and other subjects in the U.S. and beyond.

Discover

At the Michener, there is something for everyone! Learn something new about the arts, artists, and artworks in our exhibitions. Discover what it takes to put an exhibition together and how a museum works. Find out about our inspiring educational programs for all ages. Use educational materials provided on this site before, during and after your museum visit!

Discuss

Talk about art, respond to questions about art, and share your opinions about art. Engage in conversations with staff members about various art-related topics. Find out about the newest exhibit and upcoming events. Take time to reflect and think critically about works of art and see what other people are saying about them.

The Burning of Center Bridge by Edward Redfield

By | Uncategorized

Edward Redfield, a famous Pennsylvania Impressionist, preferred to paint outdoors. He completed his paintings in one sitting, a process he called “at one go.” An exception happened on July 22, 1923, when the old wooden bridge across the Delaware River at Center Bridge was struck by lightening. Redfield made notes as he watched the fire, then painted the scene the next day in his studio. The following day, he painted it again. This painting was created on July 24th, his favorite of the two canvases.

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The Jazz Trio by Joseph Meierhans

By | Uncategorized

Joseph Meierhans’ The Jazz Trio is an abstract Modernist painting, inspired by the improvisation and liveliness of jazz music. Meierhans often compared composing music to painting saying that a painting must “sing for the eye as much as music does for the ear.” In this work, he uses the repetition of colors, shapes and dynamic lines to lead the viewer’s eye around the painting and create a visual melody. The shapes and lines intersect and overlap to create movement and rhythm in the composition.

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